Hurricane names - how are they decided?

Hurricane names - how are they decided?

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Tudjátok, hogy mi alapján kapján a nevüket a hurrikánok? Íme egy rövid összefoglaló, amelyből minden kiderül! 

As Hurricane Matthew batters the Caribbean and continues its trail of destruction towards Cuba and the eastern coast of Florida, some may be wondering how the storm and others like it are given their names.

Why do hurricanes need names?

Names have been given to storms (or tropical cyclones) for at least the last 100 years. According to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), it is easier for people to remember names than numbers and technical terms.

When reported by the media, this in turn makes it easier to generate interest in major storms and therefore increase how prepared people are for a major storm to hit.

How are hurricane names chosen?

In the beginning, storms were given arbitrary names. An Atlantic storm that ripped the mast off a boat named Antje became known as Antje's hurricane. Then, in the mid-1900s, people started using female names for storms.

Then, meteorologists decided to introduce a more organised and efficient system, taking names instead from a list arranged alphabetically.

The first storm to occur in a year would be assigned a name beginning with A, and so on. Before the end of the 1900s, forecasters used male names for storms forming in the southern hemisphere.

Since 1953, storms in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and the North Atlantic have been named from lists drawn up by the National Hurricane Center. They are now maintained and updated by an international committee of the WMO.

The original list featured only women's names and in 1979, men's names were introduced - and now they alternate each year. Six lists are used in rotation, so the list for 2016 will be used again in 2022.

Does this ever change?

Yes - when a storm is deemed to be particularly deadly or costly, its name is removed from the list for reasons of sensitivity. Another name is chosen to replace it at an annual meeting of the WMO Tropical Cyclone Committees. Several names have been retired since the lists were created.

Infamous storm names such as Haiyan (Philippines, 2013), Sandy (USA, 2012), Katrina (USA, 2005), Mitch (Honduras, 1998) and Tracy (Darwin, 1974) are examples of this.

If a storm forms in the off-season, it will take the next name in the list based on the current calendar date. For example, if a tropical cyclone formed on December 28th, it would take the name from the previous season's list of names. If a storm formed in February, it would be named from the subsequent season's list of names.

In the event that more than twenty-one named tropical cyclones occur in the Atlantic basin in a season, additional storms will take names from the Greek alphabet.

 

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Alex

Arlene

Alberto

Andrea

Arthur

Ana

Bonnie

Bret

Beryl

Barry

Bertha

Bill

Colin

Cindy

Chris

Chantal

Cristobal

Claudette

Danielle

Don

Debby

Dorian

Dolly

Danny

Earl

Emily

Ernesto

Erin

Edouard

Elsa

Fiona

Franklin

Florence

Fernand

Fay

Fred

Gaston

Gert

Gordon

Gabrielle

Gonzalo

Grace

Hermine

Harvey

Helene

Humberto

Hanna

Henri

Ian

Irma

Isaac

Imelda

Isaias

Ida

Julia

Jose

Joyce

Jerry

Josephine

Julian

Karl

Katia

Kirk

Karen

Kyle

Kate

Lisa

Lee

Leslie

Lorenzo

Laura

Larry

Matthew

Maria

Michael

Melissa

Marco

Mindy

Nicole

Nate

Nadine

Nestor

Nana

Nicholas

Otto

Ophelia

Oscar

Olga

Omar

Odette

Paula

Philippe

Patty

Pablo

Paulette

Peter

Richard

Rina

Rafael

Rebekah

Rene

Rose

Shary

Sean

Sara

Sebastien

Sally

Sam

Tobias

Tammy

Tony

Tanya

Teddy

Teresa

Virgine

Vince

Valerie

Van

Vicky

Victor

Walter

Whitney

William

Wendy

Wilfred

Wanda

 

Are there storm names in the UK?

In September last year, the Met Office invited members of the public to submit names for storms for autumn/winter 2015/16 by social media.

The idea behind the pilot project was to help raise awareness of severe weather before it strikes and to ensure greater safety of the public.

Storms are given names when they are deemed to have the potential to cause 'medium' or 'high' wind impacts on the UK and/or Ireland, according to the Met Office.

As with the US system, the new naming system in Britain runs through the alphabet with alternate male and female names.

There are no storms that begin with the less common letters Q, U, X, Y or Z. The only time that there is a change in the list is if a storm is particularly deadly or costly.

If a storm is the remnants of a tropical storm or hurricane that has moved across the Atlantic, the already established method of referring to it as, for example "Ex-hurricane X", will continue.

The names for 2015/16 in full were: Abigail, Barney, Clodagh, Desmond, Eva, Frank, Gertrude, Henry, Imogen, Jake, Katie, Lawrence, Mary, Nigel, Orla, Phil, Rhonda, Steve, Tegan, Vernon, Wendy.

Storm Abigail, which arrived in November 2015, brought winds of up to 90mph and heavy winds to the UK, with parts of northern Scotland hit the hardest.

Over the course of the 2015/16 season 11 storms were named, the last being Storm Katie which hit at the end of March.

For 2016/17, a new list has been compiled using suggestions submitted through social media last year.

This year's list will begin again at 'A' and alternate male/female, starting with a male name.

UK storm names for 2016/2017

Angus, Barbara, Conor, Doris, Ewan, Fleur, Gabriel, Holly, Ivor, Jacqui, Kamil, Louise

source: The Telegraph

Other weather words. Can you match the word with its Hungarian translation?

1. blizzard

a. forgószél

2. downpour

b. ónos eső

3. whirlwind

c. hóvihar

4. sleet

d. szeles

5. blustery

e. felhőszakadás

Key:

1. c.

2. e.

3. a.

4. b.

5. d.

Vocabulary

to batter

sújtani

trail

ösvény, csapás

destruction

pusztítás

to generate interest

érdeklődést felkelteni

to increase

megnövelni

arbitrary

tetszőleges, önkényes

female name

női név

efficient

hatékony

to arrange

elrendezni

alphabetically

ABC sorrendbe

forecaster

előrejelző

male name

férfi név

hemisphere

félgömb

to alternate

váltakozni

in rotation

váltakozásban, körforgásban

to deem

valamilyennek ítélni

sensitivity

érzékenység

to retire

nyugdíjazni, törölni

infamous

hírhedt

current

mostani, jelenlegi

subsequent

következő

to raise awareness

felhívni a figyelmet

severe

súlyos

remnant

maradvány

to compile

összeállítani

Nehézségi szint:
minden szint
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