Words Kate Middleton Isn't Allowed To Say
Ezeket a szavakat nem ejtheti ki a száján Katalin hercegné

Ezeket a szavakat nem ejtheti ki a száján Katalin hercegné

A királyi család tagjai sem tehetnek meg mindent. Vannak például szavak, amiket Katalin hercegnének nem szabad használnia. Milyen szavak ezek? A leckéből kiderül.

Being a member of the aristocracy isn't all garden parties and state visits. In fact, each member of the royal family finds themselves following a fairly hefty protocol guide.

This guide dictates how a royal will dress and how they should accommodate local customs when traveling among a myriad of other things.

There is also a bunch of language use covered by royal protocol. While members of the royal family aren't going to get into trouble if they use these 15 words, they simply won't use them if they can help it.

We wonder if Kate Middleton was given them in a handy list format when she married into the family?

1. Portions

When it comes to the royal diet, they never eat their food in "portions," but rather, they prefer to fill themselves up with "helpings" instead.

2. Patio

Royal people wouldn't really know what a "patio" was. It's something that goes in an ordinary home. A palace has a "terrace" instead.

3. Function/Do

Class distinctions are rife in British society and while the peasants go to a "do" and the middle-class to a "function," the royals only go to a "party."

4. Lounge/Living Room

As far as the royals are concerned, the room many refer to as the "lounge" or "living room" is called the "drawing room" (which was short for "withdrawing room") or at a push, the "sitting room."

5. Sweet

In many a British household, the final course of a meal is a "sweet," or possibly, "afters." In Buckingham Palace, it's "pudding" and nothing else.

6. Refreshments

The royals have a peculiar disdain for all things middle-class, and "refreshments" are met with the same distaste. They stick to "food and drink."

7. Posh

The hoi-polloi may think that wealthy, important people are "posh," but the royals consider them to be "smart." If they use the word "posh," it's done to mock someone else's use of it.

8. It Was Nice To See You

Once a royal family member has bid you "goodbye," that's the end of the conversation. They're not going to follow up with "it was nice to see you."

9. Cheers

If you raise a glass to someone in a British establishment, you will normally say "cheers!" Royals don't. They offer a formal toast instead.

10. Perfume

It's an innocent enough word, but it's also too French for the royals to really get on with it. The right word in royal circles is "scent."

11. Dinner/Tea

The royals only speak of their evening meal as "supper," and never as "dinner" or "tea" mainly because this is how the lower and middle classes speak.

12. Serviette

In the royal household, it's a "napkin" and never, ever a "serviette." This may be because it's a French word, but also it may be simply too middle class for the royals.

13. "Mom and Dad"

In England, this would be "mom and dad," but the royal family doesn't use these contracted terms either. It's always "mummy and daddy."

14. Toilet

Royals don't go to the "toilet," they ask to use the "lavatory" or the "loo" instead. Other words such as "bathroom" or "gents" are considered to be too gauche.

15. Pardon

To say "pardon" is a cardinal sin in royal circles. Partly, because it's a French word when the English "sorry" will do, and partly because it's one of those words which sounds like you're trying too hard.

16. Fanny Pack

It's not just Kate Middleton that wouldn't use the next 15 words. It's all British people. This one is an absolute no-no. The word "fanny" is very much ruder in Britain than you might think. The right words are "bum bag."

17. Bachelorette

In Britain, when women get married and have a party with their female friends beforehand, it's called a "hen do." Brits aren't keen on feminizing masculine words like "bachelor."

18. Backhoe

This term probably wouldn't even be understood in Britain. It's completely American. The British prefer the word "digger" which does, to be fair to them, actually describe what the machine in question does.

19. Condo

Brits don't live in condos and they have no clue what a condo is. Their preferred term for this kind of home is "an apartment" or "a flat."

20. Cooties

Tell a British child they have cooties and they'll just look at you like you're crazy. That imaginary contagious disease is known as "the lurgy" to them.

21. Drug Store

British people tend to see drugs as illegal and the pharmaceutical products that they buy as "medicine," but a "drug store" isn't a "medicine store" in Britain, it's a "chemist."

22. Fries

When a Brit fries up some potatoes to make a delicious accompaniment to his dinner, he would never refer to the output as "fries" preferring, instead, to use the term "chips." What Americans think of a "chips," a Brit refers to as "crisps."

23. Garbage Truck

It's odd, but British people do use the word "garbage" (though they prefer "rubbish"). They also use the word "truck," though in a more limited manner than Americans and the rest of the world does. However, it's never a "garbage truck" and always a "rubbish cart."

24. Hard Candy

When British folks want to satisfy their urge for a quick sugar hit, they don't ask for "hard candy." Instead, they will request "boiled sweets."

25. Mail Carrier

The postal service in the United Kingdom is the Royal Mail, and anyone who delivers letters for that service is a "postman," "post woman," "postal worker" or "postie" and definitely not a "mail carrier."

26. Pantyhose

The term "pantyhose" occasionally seems to gain a foothold in advertising in Great Britain, but it hasn't stuck. People cover their legs with "tights" when they're British.

27. Realtor

An English person would only ever dream of buying a home from an "estate agent," they'd look at you very oddly if you suggested a "realtor."

28. Stool Pigeon

When a British person wants to inform on a criminal to law enforcement, they are said to be a "grass" and to have "grassed that person up." Nobody would have the first clue as to what a "stool pigeon" might be.

29. Two Cents Worth

Brits don't offer their "two cents worth," mainly because their currency doesn't use dollars and cents. They give their "two pence worth" or more commonly "tuppence worth" instead.

30. Undershirt

While an "undershirt" might seem like a perfect description of the garment in question because it does go under a shirt, the British prefer to use the term "vest."

It's funny how language can take on a whole new meaning depending on the speaker. Of course, most families develop their own language over time, but most don't take that as seriously as the British Royal Family.

source: wimp.com

What’s the appropriate word for the following words in the Royal Family?

portion

 

patio

 

do

 

lounge

 

sweet

 

refreshments

 

posh

 

perfume

 

serviette

 

mom and dad

 

toilet

 

pardon

 

 

Key

portion

helping

patio

terrace

do

party

lounge

drawing room, sitting room

sweet

pudding

refreshments

food and drink

posh

smart

perfume

scent

serviette

napkin

mom and dad

mummy and daddy

toilet

lavatory, loo

pardon

sorry

Vocabulary

hefty

testes, vastag

portion, helping

adag

patio

terasz

distinction

megkülönböztetés

rife

elterjedt, gyakori

peasant

paraszt

do

parti, muri

lounge

nappali

disdain

lenézés, megvetés

hoi-polloi

csőcselék

posh

előkelő, flancos

to mock

gúnyolni

toast

pohárköszöntő, tószt

scent

parfüm, illat

napkin

szalvéta

contracted term

rövidített forma

lavatory, loo

vécé, mosdó

gauche

tapintatlan

cardinal sin

főbűn

fanny

ülep, fenék

bum bag

övtáska

bachelorette party, hen do

leánybúcsú

backhoe

markológép

contagious disease

ragályos betegség

accompaniment

köret

rubbish cart

kukásautó

urge

késztetés

mail carrier

postás

pantyhose

harisnya

to gain a foothold

teret nyerni

realtor

ingatlanügynök

stool pigeon

besúgó, spicli

two cents worth

vélemény

undershirt

atléta, trikó

garment

ruhadarab

Nehézségi szint:

középfok
Tetszett a lecke? Oszd meg barátaiddal is!
Hozzászólások
comments powered by Disqus
A címlapról
Mindenféle
Szalai Nóri | 2017. Oct 12.

IGEIDŐK WORKSHOP - Szalai Nórival

Megérteni az igeidőket 1 nap alatt?  Nem lehetetlen - gyere el személyes workshopomra - és...
2017 októberi szám
Szalai Nóri | 2017. Sep 30.

MEGJELENT A MAGAZIN OKTÓBERI SZÁMA!

Már kapható minden újságárusnál, hiper- és szupermarketben, illetve benzinkúton, közel 60 perc ingyenesen letölthető hanganyaggal. 
Hasznos párbeszédek
Szalai Nóri | 2017. Sep 30.

Problems around the house - Vízvezetékszerelő hívása

Az alábbi hasznos párbeszéd a segítségedre lehet, ha vízvezetékszerelőt kell hívnod külföldön. 
Tananyagok
Szalai Nóri | 2017. Sep 25.

Greetings and introductions

A következő, nem csak kezdőknek szóló, leckéből bemutatkozással és üdvözléssel kapcsolatos kifejezéseket tanulhatsz meg.  
News Of The World
Szalai Nóri | 2017. Sep 17.

Néhány érdekesség a Parlament épületéről - természetesen angolul

Jöjjön most néhány érdekesség a Parlamentről - szigorúan turisztikai, építészeti és kultúrtörténeti szempontból. 
Kérdés küldése